American Astronomical Society

Corridors

Submissions to the AAS journals should be directed to one of the topical corridors, described below. Each corridor is managed by a different Lead Editor, and with a few minor exceptions, these corridors have been chosen to match existing IAU divisions. As it is inevitable that some papers will fall near the boundaries of these corridors, the authors should choose the corridor that they believe best reflects the emphasis of the paper. The Lead Editors reserve the right to redirect manuscripts they feel would be better suited to a different submission corridor.

The AAS journal corridors do not uniquely define the division of subject material between The Astrophysical Journal and The Astronomical Journal. The corridor descriptions below include a brief explanation of which topics will be directed to each journal within the corridor. If authors wish to indicate a journal preference that does not correspond to these descriptions, they will have the opportunity to do so during the submission process. If necessary, they can add a justification for that choice to their cover letter.

Relatively short papers of unusual significance and broad interest should be submitted to The Astrophysical Journal Letters.

icon for Galaxies and Cosmology icon

Galaxies and Cosmology

Ethan Vishniac

Ethan Vishniac
John Hopkins University, Maryland, US

@EthanVishniac

Biography

This corridor includes early universe physics, dark matter and dark energy, cosmological models, the cosmic microwave background and other diffuse backgrounds, galaxy and structure formation, stellar populations and the evolution of galaxies, physics and observations of galaxies and galaxy clusters, the intergalactic medium and reionization, and large surveys of the universe. AGN may be included here (although some aspects of AGN will also appear in the High Energy Phenomena and Fundamental Physics corridor). Papers about the internal dynamics of galaxies go here. Papers that use objects, such as supernovae, primarily as tools to study the universe as a whole, should be submitted to this corridor. Accepted papers submitted to this corridor will be published in ApJ if they have significant theoretical content, AJ if they are primarily observational, or ApJ Supplements if they are devoted to the description of large data sets with little theoretical interpretation.

Representative Articles:

  1. Testing lambda and the limits of cosmography with the Union2.1 supernova compilation, Brett Bochner et al. 2015 ApJ 814 7
  2. The role of star formation and an AGN in dust heating of z = 0.3–2.8 galaxies. I. Evolution with redshift and luminosity, Allison Kirkpatrick et al. 2015 ApJ 814 9
  3. Simulating the galaxy cluster “El Gordo” and identifying the merger configuration, Congyao Zhang et al. 2015 ApJ 813 129
icon for High-energy Phenomena and Fundamental Physics

High-energy Phenomena and Fundamental Physics

Frank Timmes

Frank Timmes
Arizona State University, Arizona, US

Biography

This corridor includes the physics and observations of collapsed objects (neutron stars and black holes), processes that produce high energy photons and particles (including cosmic rays) either by themselves or as part of a broad spectrum of emission, the physics of ionized accretion disks and jets, and theoretical and observational studies of supernovae. (Supernovae as tools to study cosmology would normally go in the first corridor.) Other relevant topics include plasma astrophysics, magnetohydrodynamics, shocks, particle acceleration, photoionization, jets, high energy outflows, bursts, extreme gravity, strong magnetic fields, etc. Accepted papers submitted to this corridor will usually be published in ApJ.

Representative Articles:

  1. On the origin and physics of gamma flares in crab nebula, George Machabeli et al. 2015 ApJ 814 38
  2. The rate of core collapse supernovae to Redshift 2.5 from the CANDELS and CLASH supernova surveys, Louis-Gregory Strolger et al. 2015 ApJ 813 93
  3. Super strong magnetic fields of neutron stars in Be X-ray binaries estimated with new torque and magnetosphere models, Chang-Sheng Shi et al. 2015 ApJ 813 91
icon for Stars and Stellar Physics

Stars and Stellar Physics

Steve Kawaler

Steve Kawaler
Iowa State University, Iowa, US

@SteveKawaler

Biography

This corridor includes papers on the properties of stars of all masses and evolutionary stages and the physical mechanisms that govern them. This covers a broad range of aspects, including the determination of stellar observable properties and their time variability with all possible observational techniques, the investigation of their atmospheric and internal constitution, stellar winds and outflows, the theoretical modeling of stellar formation, structure, and evolution, the techniques used to measure and classify stars such as spectroscopy, radial velocities and photometry, and the production of stellar predictions (e.g. stellar evolution tracks, lifetimes, chemical yields, star-planet interactions, etc) used by the astronomical community at large. Papers on young stars should be submitted here, but papers on protostellar disks and the environments around young or forming stars, either theoretical or observational, should be submitted to the Interstellar Matter and the Local Universe corridor. Accepted papers in this corridor may be published in either AJ or ApJ, depending on whether the emphasis is on stellar physics or on observational parameters of particular stars or systems. Papers consisting of catalogs of stellar properties, with relatively little interpretation, may be published in ApJ Supplements.

Representative Articles:

  1. How massive single stars end their life, A. Heger et al. 2003 ApJ 591 288
  2. Modules for experiments in stellar astrophysics (MESA), Bill Paxton et al. 2011 ApJS 192 3
  3. A comprehensive spectroscopic analysis of DB white dwarfs, P. Bergeron et al. 2011 ApJ 737 28
icon for The Solar System, Exoplanets, and Astrobiology

The Solar System, Exoplanets, and Astrobiology

Melissa McGrath

Melissa McGrath
SWRI and SETI, Huntsville, Alabama, US

@astromel

Biography

This corridor includes papers on exoplanets and solar system objects, including moons and minor bodies. Topics would include the physics of planet formation, and the dynamics of planetary systems, including celestial mechanics. (This last is found in IAU Division A, which is not represented by its own corridor here.) Papers relevant to astrobiology should be submitted to this corridor. As in the previous category, the division between AJ and ApJ primarily depends on whether the content is primarily observational or theoretical. However, following a longstanding tradition, papers in celestial mechanics are typically published in AJ. Papers in astrobiology will normally be published in AJ.

Representative Articles:

  1. Most 1.6 Earth-radius planets are not rocky, Leslie A. Rogers 2015 ApJ 801 41
  2. A quantitative criterion for defining planets, Jean-Luc Margot 2015, AJ 150 185
  3. Chaotic disintegration of the inner solar system, Konstantin Batygin et al. 2015 ApJ 799 120
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Interstellar Matter and the Local Universe

Judith Pipher

Judith Pipher
University of Rochester, New York, US

Biography

This corridor includes papers on the interstellar medium (ISM) and the stars in our Milky Way and in nearby galaxies (out to ~15 Mpc). The ISM and stars, the two major visible components of a galaxy, are coupled to each other through star formation, stellar feedback and their gravitational potential. Topics range from detailed studies of the physics and chemistry of different components of the ISM (ionized, neutral, molecular), both locally and on galaxywide scales, to measurements of resolved stellar populations and star clusters in the Local Universe and the dynamics of galaxies. The formation and evolution of atoms, molecules and dust during all phases of star formation and death are an integral part of ISM studies. Finally, this corridor includes studies of debris disks and protoplanetary disks. Papers on the ISM, dust, those related to star formation, and laboratory astrophysics relevant to molecules, atoms and dust particles will be published in ApJ. Data-intensive papers will be published in AJ. Papers that consist of compilations of observational data with relatively little theoretical interpretation can be published in ApJ Supplements.

Representative Articles:

  1. A Spitzer view of the giant molecular cloud Mon OB1 East/NGC 2264, V. A. Rapson et al. 2014 ApJ 794 124
  2. The Off-Nuclear Starbursts in NGC 4038/4039 (The Antennae Galaxies), Z. Wang et al. 2004 ApJS 154 193
  3. A structural analysis of star-forming region AFGL 490, L. C. Masiunas et al. 2012 ApJ 752 127
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The Sun and the Heliosphere

Leon Golub

Leon Golub
Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Massachusetts, US

Biography

This corridor includes everything having to do with the Sun, its internal structure and dynamics, the solar wind out to the heliopause, and the interaction between the solar wind and the ISM. Papers accepted through this corridor will be published in ApJ or ApJ Supplements.

Representative Articles:

  1. How gas-dynamic flare models powered by Petschek reconnection differ from those with ad hoc energy sources, D. W. Longcope and J. A. Klimchuk 2015 ApJ 813 131
  2. Thermalization of heavy ions in the solar wind, Patrick J. Tracy et al. 2015 ApJ 812 170
  3. The relation between solar eruption topologies and observed flare features. I. Flare ribbons, A. Savcheva et al. 2015 ApJ 810 96
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Instrumentation, Software, Laboratory Astrophysics, and Data

Chris Lintott

Chris Lintott
Oxford University, UK

@chrislintott

Biography

This corridor includes papers on instrumentation, astronomical software and computing, large databases, as well as methodological papers that are not strongly tied to a particular subject category already listed above. Laboratory experiments aimed at understanding astrophysical phenomena (“Laboratory Astrophysics”) is also part of this category (shared with ISM and the Local Universe). Authors should also consult the newly revised AAS policy on Software. Accepted papers in this category will be normally be published in AJ, but when appropriate (e.g. software for cosmology) the corridor also feeds into ApJ.

Representative Articles:

  1. yt: A multi-code analysis toolkit for astrophysical simulation data, Matthew J. Turk et al. 2011 ApJS 192 9
  2. Three-dimensional radiation transfer in young stellar objects, B. A. Whitney et al. 2013 ApJS 207 30
  3. galpy: A python Library for Galactic Dynamics, J. Bovy 2015 ApJ 216 29